East Central Health of Georgia

East Central Health District

Georgia Department of Public Health’s Babies Can’t Wait Program Seeks Public Comment

 

ATLANTA – The Georgia Department of Public Health’s (DPH) Babies Can’t Wait (BCW) program invites interested persons to participate in a 60-day public comment period for the Federal Fiscal Year (FFY) 2016 Annual State Application under Part C of the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA) and Stakeholders, early intervention providers, parents and members of the public are encouraged to comment and may review the grant application and revised policy online or at locations throughout the state.

Comments will be accepted in four ways:

  1. Written comments will be received by mail until Apr. 15, 2016: Babies Can’t Wait
    Attn: Judy Threlkeld, Interim Part C Coordinator 2 Peachtree Street NW, Suite 11th Floor Atlanta, GA 30303-13422
  2. Email comments will be received until Apr. 15, 2016:DPH-MCHDO@dph.ga.gov (Subject line: Part C or Public Comment)
  3. Facsimile comments will be received until April 15, 2016: State BCW Office Fax: (404-657-7307)
  4. In Person comments at a Public Hearing: DPH invites interested persons to attend Public Hearings and present public comments. To allow an opportunity for all to be heard, comments will be limited to five minutes. (See locations listed below.)

The Babies Can’t Wait (BCW) Program is Georgia’s statewide early intervention system for infants and toddlers with special needs, age birth to three, and their families. This program enhances the capacity of families to meet the special needs of their child in order to ensure that each young child with significant developmental delays achieves his or her maximum developmental potential.

We Protect Lives.

To learn more about DPH’s Babies Can’t Wait program, please call 404-657-2850 or 888-651-8224 or visit http://dph.georgia.gov/Babies-Cant-Wait.

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About the Georgia Department of Public Health

The Georgia Department of Public Health (DPH) is the lead agency in preventing disease, injury and disability; promoting health and well-being; and preparing for and responding to disasters from a health perspective. In 2011, the General Assembly restored DPH to its own state agency after more than 30 years of consolidation with other departments. At the state level, DPH functions through numerous divisions, sections, programs and offices. Locally, DPH funds and collaborates with Georgia’s 159 county health departments and 18 public health districts. Through the changes, the mission has remained constant – to protect the lives of all Georgians. Today, DPH’s main functions include: Health Promotion and Disease Prevention, Maternal and Child Health, Infectious Disease and Immunization, Environmental Health, Epidemiology, Emergency Preparedness and Response, Emergency Medical Services, Pharmacy, Nursing, Volunteer Health Care, the Office of Health Equity, Vital Records, and the State Public Health Laboratory. For more information about DPH, visit www.dph.georgia.gov.

 


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